Happy Trailering, Part 1

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Melinda Folse
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Is anyone but me getting desperate for a trailer? I love where I keep my horses, and I know everything is just as it should be right now, horse accommodation wise. But I'm feeling kind of arena locked and claustrophobic. If only I had a trailer (and, oh, wait, a big ol' truck, because I drive a Mini), I could load up and go to the Grasslands -- or even a few closer trails -- for an afternoon in the great big, rail-less outdoors. And as good as I know this would be for my horses' minds, I know it would be even better for mine. There's just something magical about a trail ride for clearing everyone's mind and recharging your soul. But do you know what worries me about having a trailer? Pulling it. Once before when I was on a serious trailer quest, and again while researching the Trailering chapter for The Smart Woman's Guide to Midlife Horses, I ran across the same thing time and again. Everyone says how "easy" it is to pull a trailer. They think it's comforting to tell me "you won't even know it's back there!" That, my friends, is precisely what I'm afraid of. For people who have grown up hauling horses, pulling a trailer (and backing it!) is second nature. They honestly don't know what the big deal is. Or why I'm so wigged out. They scoff at my need for formal instruction (beyond the trailer salesman who offers to "take me out back and show me" how to pull a trailer.) They think ?Something tells me this is a skill that can't be learned in one 30-minute session. I want rules, instruction, safety procedures and practice opportunities. But guess what? If a six-week trailer pulling course is out there (besides truck driver school) I sure haven't found it. I understand and appreciate that those who have pulled trailers a lot are walking around with knowledge inside them they don't even know is there. But when trouble shows up, they reach for it and it's there to help them figure out what to do. On the other hand, if I'm pulling a trailer full of horses and get into trouble (blowout, bad weather, horrible high speed traffic, some jerk cuts me off ?or stops suddenly without warning) I'd reach for that instinct born of knowledge and experience and come up empty handed. And most likely, hysterical. So as I begin this "happy trailering" series of posts, I invite your participation and response. What are your trailering questions and concerns? What worries you most when you're pulling a trailer? How did you learn (or how do you plan to learn) to pull a trailer? And for heaven's sake, if you're one of those folks who has hauled a lot, please share any insights, tips and wisdom you can put your finger on to help keep the rest of us from becoming road hazards! Here's to Happy Trailering! Melinda

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