Right Facts About Equine Deworming, Part Three

You can't manage what you don't measure even when it comes to horse deworming. Horse owners need to monitor their farm to determine which horses need to be treated in an equine deworming program and to understand which products are still effective on thei
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You can't manage what you don't measure even when it comes to horse deworming. Horse owners need to monitor their farm to determine which horses need to be treated in an equine deworming program and to understand which products are still effective on thei

Since those little bugs love warm weather, here’s info from Merial for your best horse dewormer schedule.

Horses ingest worm eggs and larvae when they graze.

Horses ingest worm eggs and larvae when they graze.

Go get 'em!

Amy

FACT. You can't manage what you don't measure, even when it comes to horse deworming. Horse owners need to monitor their farm to determine which horses need to be treated in an equine deworming program and to understand which products are still effective on their farm. The best way to do that is to work with a veterinarian who understands the newest concept of parasite control as part of a horse dewormer schedule.

Monitoring requires a specific but simple series of fecal egg count (FEC) tests in your horse dewormer schedule to determine which horses are harboring which worms, which horses are shedding relatively high numbers of worm eggs, and which horse deworming medications are still effective for controlling the worms.

FACT. Veterinary advice on horse deworming isn't free, but it will pay back more than you spend. While involving your veterinarian in things like FECs may have a cost, it's likely less expensive than using multiple doses of horse deworming products that have little benefit for parasite control on your farm. These products may actually increase the prevalence of resistant parasites, undermining your equine deworming strategy.

It's important that horse owners work with a knowledgeable equine veterinarian to sample fresh manure for the presence and quantities of worm eggs in each horse on the farm as part of their horse dewormer schedule. Developing a horse deworming strategy based on the individual needs of your horses can actually save you money in the long run.

To learn more about deworming, download our FREE guide—Deworming Your Horse: How to find the best deworming schedule for you and your horse.

FACT. Tapeworms are a hidden, harmful parasite when it comes to deworming horses. Tapeworms are a common parasite in the horse, with more than 54 percent of horses nationwide infected at some point in their lives. While signs of infection are not obvious and often go undiagnosed by many when deworming horses, this parasite can cause potentially serious health problems including colic, irritation and inflammation of the intestine, especially the colon. The tapeworm is not a parasite horse owners can afford to ignore when they plan their horse dewormer schedule.

GET THE FACTS. In support of horse owners' efforts to learn the facts about strategic horse deworming protocols, Merial has launched an educational campaign called "Greetings, Human." The initiative humorously recognizes that if worms could talk, they would tell horse owners to ignore these new facts and to keep on using equine deworming products the way they have for decades.

For more information about this campaign and facts on deworming horses, parasite control and resistance, go to www.zimecterin.com.