Time for Tea?

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Melinda Folse
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Ok, I admit it. The idea of having tea with my horse made me giggle. After all, the notion of viewing grooming your horse as a Japanese tea ceremony as proposed by Allan J. Hamilton, MD, in his book, Zen Mind, Zen Horse seemed a little over the top at first. After all, I come from a background of "just brush off the part where the saddle goes." My understanding of grooming got a little more refined watching the folks at Downunder Horsemanship and Hacienda Tres Aguilas, as well as observing the grooming rituals of numerous friends who show. And when researching the Good Horsekeeping chapter of The Smart Woman's Guide to Midlife Horses

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, I learned scads about what goes in the grooming box/cabinet and what tasks need to be tended to in taking care of a horse's coat, hooves, mane and tail. That's not to say I really do all that stuff, but I do try to brush the whole horse now. And pick his feet before and after I ride. And rinse them off with the hose on hot days after a sweaty ride. Some would call this progress, others would say it's pampering. Welcome to the wide world of horse experts. But Hamilton's suggestion takes this well-worn topic to a whole new level. As on of his book's main tenets, Hamilton advises us to practice being present with our horse. Now, granted, this is not new advice, either, but he offers us here a whole new way to get there beyond "check your life baggage outside the barn door." Hamilton says that the best way to beckon this sacred "in-the-moment" frame of mind is to create a grooming ritual that reconnects you with your horse. "Lay out your grooming tools and always do the same things in the same order," he advises, taking time to "put all your love and affection for this animal into each stroke of the brush." Check out Hamilton's "tea ceremony" video that made me want to try this:

After watching this video, I went out and gave it a try with Trace, my hypersensitive "why-are-you-touching-me?!?!" horse. He was big-eyed wary at first (probably assuming I was about to put that dreaded saddle on him), but in spite of himself, he began to relax. By the time we got to the soft finishing brush, his head was down, his eyes were closed, and when he heaved the biggest sigh I've ever heard from him, so did I. So put your snickers aside, go assemble your grooming tools, and give this "tea ceremony" thing a try. I can't wait to hear what happens!