Gluquestrian Powder? Other joint supplements?
Last Post 21 Jan 2012 06:26 PM by Equi Search. 31 Replies.
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NMynarichUser is Offline
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14 Sep 2009 07:17 PM

    Has anyone ever used Gluquestrian Powder by MD's Choice?  http://www.gluquestrian.com/  It seems to have good reviews online, and I'm intrigued by the "results based guarantee," but it's expensive.   I like the ingredients (glucosamine-sulfate and MSM), as I use them for myself for joint maintenance. 

    Has anyone else had good experiences with any other joint supplements that may be less expensive?

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 06:13 AM

    There are SO many out there, in all price ranges, aren't there?  I like this one:

    http://www.horse.com/For-A-Flex-Joi...BWF02.html

     To me, for the money, it is the most complete with the highest doses of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate AND MSM.  Depending on the horse (i.e. the type of arthritis) the MSM may be all you need, but make sure it is high grade, pure MSM.

    There are some cheaper ones out there, but I think you'll find they have much lower amounts of each component.

    NMynarichUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 07:05 AM

    Yeah, I kind of figure this is one area that you really just get what you pay for. 

    I bought some of the Gluquestrian Powder to try, so we'll see how it goes.  But I'm still interested in any cheaper suggestions that anyone may have for future months.  I am buying this simply for maintenance, not for any major problem solving.  I'm sure Arizen is starting to get mild arthritis at her age, and I want to keep her in good working condition, epecially now that she's getting back into work.

    I am also going to grab some Horseshoer's Secret because Arizen's feet crack so easily, especially in the summer months with all the stomping.  I'd like to avoid shoeing her, but she's got some nice sized cracks at this point.  I'm going to see what the farrier says.

    The For-A-Flex that you suggested has Glucosamine-HCl.  I have been reading that recent research has shown that Glucosamine-Sulfate is more effective than Glucosamine-HCl.  Who knows...

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 07:23 AM

    at www.glucosamine-arthritis.org:

    What is Glucosamine Sulfate?

    Glucosamine Sulfate (also known as Glucosamine Sulphate) is the form that has been tested in dozens of clinical trials. It is very similar to glucosamine HCL (hydrochloride) in effectiveness, because the sulfate is simply a carrier molecule for the actual glucosamine. Another popular form of glucosamine is known as glucosamine HCL, or hydrochloride. Some studies have shown the HCL to be more effective and some have shown the sulfate to be more effective, so it would be prudent to either try both individually (probably not the most cost effective option) and see which one works better for you, or ideally simply find a product that contains both HCL and Sulfate.

    The good new is if you're using it strictly for maintenance, the lower dosage amounts are less and may work just fine for Arizen so you may be able to use a much lower priced one.  I think it's a great idea for preventative maintenance.

    [quote user="Nicole"]I am also going to grab some Horseshoer's Secret because Arizen's feet crack so easily,[/quote]

    You might check into a pure Biotin supplement for this as well, rather than the Horseshoer's Secret, it didn't have enough Biotin in it for my horse with bad feet.  Something else to think about too is if you do feed more than one supplement, you might check out Smart Pak.  I've never used them but I know people who really like it.
    NMynarichUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 07:35 AM

    Thanks!  Good info.  I'm new to all this stuff, so I'm going by advice, research, and trial-and-error. 

    Biotin would be the effective ingredient in hoof formulas then?  Can you give too much biotin?

    I'll look more closely into Smart Pak, but I've gotten the catelogs before and they seem to be more expensive simply because of the customized packaging. 

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 08:44 AM

    I was too, just tried different things since a lot has changed and improved from the way my parents raised me (as far as supplements) caring for our horses, that's why I wanted to help if I could! 

    Biotin is the best thing for the keratin in the hooves, and as a bonus it's also really good for skin and coat!  Methionine is an important amino acid found in keratin and so if you can get a Biotin supplement with Methionine in it too, that would be the best.  I recommend following the dosage amounts on the product, especially the loading dosage at first.  You know how long it takes to grow a new hoof, so be patient, it won't happen overnight and it's really something you have to stick with but it works.

    I felt the same way about SmartPak, but they have their own label now with regular sized packages, not just the little dosage paks, and so their pricing is a lot more competitive.

    NMynarichUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 09:28 AM

    I would definitely follow the dosages, but I guess I meant to say if I should get a supplement with a higher dosage of Biotin or a lower dosage, or if it really mattered.  I've also got Rainmaker and Keratex hoof hardener, but its harder to keep up with applying it so I think supplements will really help us out.

    But yes, I plan on it taking 8 or 9 months to fully regrow her feet.  I'd like to keep her barefoot so I'm planning on a long-term hoof supplement plan.  She's got typical TB feet, so she'll need the supplements if I expect to keep her barefoot.  She's got a couple of cracks that are pretty long and concern me a bit.  They may just be surface cracks for now, but I'm worried about them getting worse.  I'm going to ask the farrier what he thinks.  Hopefully I wont need to put shoes on her until the cracks grow out.

    Thanks again for the info!

    TCFarm50User is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 09:41 AM

    I did use a liquid supplement that had Yucca in it, with much success; I'll get back to you, as I can't remember the name of it! But it was inexpensive and more on the "natural" side and tasted sweet (yes, I tasted it!) so you could pour it in with the feed without it ending up on the bottom of the feeder.

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 10:07 AM

    I've tried that too TC, cuz it wasn't that long ago we couldn't get the joint and hoof supplements at feed stores here in TX .  Actually you can't get more natural that Biotin and Methionine. 

    And I guess I should have been clearer too, what I meant was higher amounts or more miligrams per dose of each.  Like some of them are really low, something like 12 mg per dose, but they cost less per lb.

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    15 Sep 2009 03:35 PM

    Nicole, you might want to check out Glanzen 3C from SmartPak -- I used it for my TB's feet (which were horrible when I got him) and it made a huge difference. The thing I like about the Glanzen is that it has higher amounts of biotin, methionine, etc. than most other supplements, plus it has B-vitamins. I've also heard great things about Super Biozin (think that's the name), but have never tried it myself. The SmartHoof Ultra looks good, too. 

    As far as joint supplements, I used SmartFlex Senior -- awesome stuff! It has glucosamine, chondroitin, MSM, boswelia, devil's claw, probiotics, etc. Even if your horse isn't a senior, it's still very beneficial.

    I know a lot of people haven't tried SmartPaks because they think they're more expensive; but, for most supplements, this is not the case. And it gave me peace of mind because I knew exactly how many SmartPaks my horse should go through; so, if there had been extras, I would know that my horse had not gotten his supplements. In boarding barns, it makes a lot of sense (plus, it makes things easier on the barn staff).

    Also, Uckele makes a lot of very high-quality supplements. Some of them are offered in SmartPaks, but not many. Their site is http://www.uckeleequinenutrition.com/ 

    ctungateUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 10:38 AM

     I haven't used this particular product, but am currently using HylaRx Complete.  It has the addition of HA (hyaluronic acid) along with glucosamine, chrondoitin sulfate and MSM.  It's working very well for my older gelding, where I didn't see much of a difference with him with other joint supplements without the HA. 

     I use this chart from smartpak quite a bit: 

         http://www.smartpakequine.com/chart...mpare.html

    Sorry, you'll have to cut and paste the address.  Obviously, it has their prices for cost per day, but the ingredient comparison between products is great!

     

     

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 11:49 AM

    My vet told me that, while the SmartFlex senior has HA in it, it actually isn't very bioavailable because it's in a powder form. He said the liquid/paste/gels are far superior when you are giving hyaluronic acid.

    So, in addition to the SmartFlex Senior, I also started using Conquer HA paste. It's funny, the trainer at my barn calls the stuff "crack" because it makes the older, stiffer horses feel so good. And it certainly seemed to make a big difference in my old guy! He was bucking and trying to run away with me in no time.

    Just wanted to give you even more information to ponder, Nicole!

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 12:43 PM

    Actually the best HA is injected straight into the joints, but you did say you wanted something reasonably priced, and in my opinion HA is way out of that league.  A steady supplement diet of glucosamine and MSM has worked fine for us, but it's something you have to stick with, just like the B-vitamin Biotin.

    ctungateUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 03:00 PM

    [quote user="txspots"]Actually the best HA is injected straight into the joints,[/quote] 

    Very true, but I cannot afford that!  The oral HA seems to be making a difference for my guy, so I'm good with that.  I was also concerned about the availability of HA in the powder, but my vet said I should try the supplement first and see if I noticed any difference.  Maybe there's just enough "bio-available" for him?  Hard to say - but, it's working for him!  

    There are so many different supplements out there with so many different concentrations of additives, you'll just have to find want works best for your horse!

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 03:10 PM

    [quote user="txspots"]Actually the best HA is injected straight into the joints[/quote]

    Yikes! I would save the drastic measures for much later. As I recall, Arizen is still fairly young. Legend is great stuff, but I would actually start with the IM injections; injecting joint capsules is a pretty major thing.

     

    NMynarichUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 05:59 PM

    [quote user="Frizzle"]Just wanted to give you even more information to ponder, Nicole![/quote]

     Haha, no no this is great.  And I certainly have no intentions of injecting her joints unless/until absolutely necessary.  But I know that was not was txspots was suggesting anyway.  Just saying.

     We'll see how a steady dose of glucosamine and msm serves Riz, and if necessary I'll look into adding HA, but I've seen that it can be quite pricey. 

    Loving the info!  Thanks guys! 

    SolarisUser is Offline
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    16 Sep 2009 06:45 PM

     I love SmartFlex Senior and also SmartHoof.  You really can't beat Super BioZin for crappy feet, but once Solo grew out nice new ones, I switched him to the SmartHoof to see if it would do as well (it was a lot cheaper) and it is GREAT stuff.  

    I find that in a boarding barn, SmartPaks are really great and I think they are very affordable when you factor in everything including (1) I never have to go to the store to buy supplements (2) I am able to buy stuff that's not available around here and usually get free shipping (3) I know my horse gets an accurate amount of the correct stuff every day (4) It's never sitting around long enough to degrade or expire (5) I don't have to spend any time pre-measuring or whatnot.  If I was feeding him myself I would probably feel differently, but as a boarder, I will NEVER give up my SmartPaks!  I even get my dog food from them now because it priced out pretty comparably.

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    17 Sep 2009 12:28 PM

    yeah, I think they've (smartpaks) come a long way too.  i know that when they first came out they were so novel and so convenient that they were pret-ty pric-ey; but now like i say that they have their own Smart-brands, they're much more reasonably priced, and convenient not only if you board but if you ever travel without your ponies and have to have a horse sitter. 

    NMynarichUser is Offline
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    17 Sep 2009 06:26 PM

    I'm not too worried at the barn I board at now, having worked there and knowing how the system works, but for future barns SmartPaks do seem to be the way to go.  Now that I look at them again, they seem to have become much more reasonable.  I will definitely keep them in mind!  Do they ship directly to the barn or to your house?  It wasn't quite clear on the website.

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    17 Sep 2009 07:40 PM

    [quote user="Nicole"]Do they ship directly to the barn or to your house? [/quote]

    You can get them shipped to either your barn or your house. If multiple people at your barn get Smartpaks, you can become "Barn Buddies" and have your stuff shipped together for a reduced rate.

    The other great thing is they have flat-rate shipping; so, even if you order a tack trunk, you only pay $7.95 for shipping. Not a bad deal.

    I swear I do not work for them (although, how cool would that be?).

     

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