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how to keep the water trough clean
Last Post 29 Aug 2009 01:32 PM by Emolee. 25 Replies.
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Bassmaster031User is Offline
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05 Jul 2009 07:28 PM

    i was wondering how you could keep the inside of the trough clean. if you have a trough you can see some slime of scum build up after a couple days them you have to clean the whole thing and get new water. now i was wondering if anyone had any kind of trick to keep the trough clean without hurting the horses

    all replies appreciated

    jwelshansUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 04:49 AM
    I put mine in the shade... no sunlight. That helps a lot.  I've tried using a little vinegar in the water but my girls don't like it... yours might. When it's very hot (90s plus) I  fill with what they will drink in 24 hours and dump and scrub daily before refilling. Good luck.
    FocusCalmPatienceUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 07:38 AM

    There was a great thread on this just recently, I cant find it, but maybe someone who knows this site better could?? There were several pages of great tips, like using goldfish, or bleach.  I cant remember them all!

    Dr OUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 07:55 AM

    we put goldfish in there and it keeps it pretty clean. I would NOT put anything like bleach in there.

    walkinthewalkUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 08:11 AM

    An old cowboy outside Flagstaff, AZ where I layed my horses up during our cross-country move, used bluing in his metal stock tanks.

    Tthat would be the same bluing grandma used to wash the whites in.

     All three of my horses drank more of his water than anywhere else.

    It was sparkling clean and no bugs either.

    Jayne-AdminUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 08:38 AM

    Was this the thread you were thinking of?

    Clean Water

    Equi SearchUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 08:54 AM
    I've also read of putting goldfish in the tank, as Dr. O posted. I'm not sure what happens to them during the winter, though. Maybe you take them out before it freezes, or maybe they'd be okay if you heat your trough for the cold months.
    ctungateUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2009 10:04 AM

     I have goldfish in my tanks and they do quite well over the winter with trough heaters.  However, they don't do much to help keep the tanks clean of algae.  They have more of an effect on mosquito larvae.  I was given a very large plecostomas (catfish relative) that does a great job on the algae.  

    Keeping the troughs out of the daylight helps slow the algae growth, but if you want crystal clean troughs, you still need to scrub them out.

    walkinthewalkUser is Offline
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    07 Jul 2009 04:28 AM

    [quote user="remmer"]Keeping the troughs out of the daylight helps slow the algae growth, but if you want crystal clean troughs, you still need to scrub them out.
    [/quote]

    I was thinking that in the first place but still went with the bluing.  Which, if I were going to use something, it would be the bluing.  My horses really liked drinking the water at that old cowboy's ranch.

    If you're horses are on your property to where you can control what kind of tanks you use, I would switch out the big tanks to 20 gallon muck tubs for the warmer weather. 

     During the summer I have 4 water stations and the only one with shade is the one under the overhang at the barn.

    I have a total of five 20 gallon muck tubs that are out in the sun and the 150 gallon rubber tank is under the overhang.

    Those muck tubs are much easier to handle and faster to clean; plus the horses drink them down faster so you're not wasting as much water when you do have to dump them.

     In the winter I only have two heated stock tanks for the horses and they are both at the barn.

    I use a fish net to clean the tanks and tubs every day because it extends the "life of the water".  Unless we have a dry winter and get a lot of wind blowing dust/debris around, I only have to empty the stock tanks once in the winter to clean them and then again when spring gets here and they are getting put up.

    It goes without saying that one has an extended day doing all of this rigamarole.  I do work but am old enough that there aren't children at home to also take care.

    I am sorry to say this but I using fish in the water tanks is not my idea of keeping them clean.  They have to do their own business somewhere and that is in the water tank.  Plus I have one horse that would swallow those fish "just because".  He is 15 and still can't keep anything out of his mouth including the cat, paper towels, and plastic bags.  I can't leave anything in front of him for two seconds and the bobtail cat he likes has learned to keep it's distance from him - even though Rusty does pick him up by the scruff of his neck  Stick out tongue

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    07 Jul 2009 05:59 AM

    Something I have tried with some success as far as wasting the water you dump is I put a really long hose in my 100 gal trough, turn the water on at the faucet then turn it off, then disconnect it from the faucet and pull that end out onto the grass (or dust, these days) which creates a siphon that uses the old water to water the grass.  We're in such a drought here that it helps, a little.

    Equi SearchUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2009 06:05 AM

    Hi,

     This product works really well. Just make sure your tanks are scrubbed and rinsed really clean before you use it. I like baking soda as a scrub/cleanser it work well scum and build up and it's safe.

    Also when you add water to the tubs if there is any grass or hay floating remove it, that will also help keep the algae down.

     

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail....6e6069f79a

     

    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_library_info.html?product=204252fb-06d0-4ed5-a845-d66e6069f79a&showText=1

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2009 06:56 AM

    Thanks Hrsepla - must be new, have not seen that before.  I will definitely give it a try!

    MacQuarabUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2009 08:30 AM

    [quote user="walkinthewalk"]

    An old cowboy outside Flagstaff, AZ where I layed my horses up during our cross-country move, used bluing in his metal stock tanks.

    Tthat would be the same bluing grandma used to wash the whites in.

     All three of my horses drank more of his water than anywhere else.

    It was sparkling clean and no bugs either.

    [/quote] 

     

    Why would you let your horses drink chemicals?

     

    Actually I have researched this for years and hav came to a conclusion a long time ago. Unless you have a problem with mosquito larva in your troughs, there is nothing wrong with alittle algea in the water.

     

     

    ctungateUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2009 09:07 AM

    ctungateUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2009 09:14 AM

    Not quite sure what happened there, but let's try again:

    [quote user="walkinthewalk"]I am sorry to say this but I using fish in the water tanks is not my idea of keeping them clean.  They have to do their own business somewhere and that is in the water tank[/quote] 

    I don't have this problem, since my goldfish are trained to use the litterbox outside the tank.  Wink   There are only five goldfish per tank and I still empty the tank once a week to get out all the crud that seems to be magnetically attracted to the tanks, so I don't think there's a build-up issue.  Of all the other things that get in tanks, a little goldfish poop is the least of my worries. 

    I also use an old kitchen strainer to skim off the junk that accumulates on the water surface.  As you say, walkinthewalk, it really helps to extend the "life" of the water. 

    Bassmaster031User is Offline
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    08 Jul 2009 07:17 PM

    i havent checked this in a while but i do like all of the ideas

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    09 Jul 2009 07:29 AM

    [quote user="Sussie "]

    Actually I have researched this for years and hav came to a conclusion a long time ago. Unless you have a problem with mosquito larva in your troughs, there is nothing wrong with alittle algea in the water.

    [/quote]I agree, because there's always going to be "a little" - but when it's triple digits outside everyday since mid June, there's ALOT in mine so I need all the help I can get!  And yes we have mosquito larvae year 'round.
    MacQuarabUser is Offline
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    09 Jul 2009 07:40 AM

     Luckily we dont have larva problem here. Plus I keep my trough in the shade. Sun, hot weather and standing water are the perfect combo to grow algea. But if you keep the trough in the shade, your algea is next to nothing. 

     

     

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    09 Jul 2009 12:13 PM

    [quote user="Sussie "]

    But if you keep the trough in the shade, your algea is next to nothing. 

     

    [/quote]maybe if it doesn't get to 110 degrees everyday (or 100 in the shade?)

    either that, or there's something wrong with our shade other than there's not enough! Wink  I think it might also have something to do with the actual water, how hard/soft it is or the mineral content?  Because ours tastes horrible, it's high calcium content and we have worse algae than we did when we lived in the Hill Country.

    MacQuarabUser is Offline
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    09 Jul 2009 12:27 PM

     We have hard water.

     It only gets about 100.

     

    BUT! This is the weird thing. I have two water troughs. Both in the shade, one is a black "Tuff-Stuff" brand. The other is the old tried and true galvanized metal. The black one stays about 20 degrees cooler than the metal one does.

     

     

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