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Deep sole bruises?
Last Post 09 Jul 2010 05:51 AM by txspots. 15 Replies.
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BuckskinPaintUser is Offline
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03 Jul 2010 05:04 PM
       It seems that Jet has deep bruises in both front feet. Anyone have experience with this? His feet also look to be about as flat as pancakes. (mostly front). The vet said he is 99% + sure that it is just bruising and not something farther up the leg. He did a nerve block and he trotted off sound after. He suggested shoes after his bruises heal to prevent further issues. I am soaking his feet in epsom salts, then letting them dry and packing and bandaging them using icthamol. I am hoping he will be well enough to shoe soon. The vet was out on wednesday. I know it will be a while before returning to full work, but I am wondering more along the lines of a timeline as to when he could be shod and be more comfortable. Sorry about the novel. It's just that it's been a while that Jet has been sore and I just want him to feel better.
    WillowLarkUser is Offline
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    03 Jul 2010 08:20 PM
    I've got one dealing with really bad sole bruising on one front hoof.  This was not a barefoot horse, and in fact this was caused by improperly fit horseshoes (yes, I have a new farrier now).  My vet didn't recommend any of the above...in fact, after trimming the hoof properly, the farrier put him in a heart bar shoe and we started him on a good hoof supplement.  We also game him bute for 5 days.  When it started he was so lame he couldn't bear weight on the bad hoof (which was why we used the heart bar).  He only wore the heart bar for the first 4 weeks and then back in a regular shoe.  6 weeks later he is only slightly off at the trot.  We are painting his soles with a venice turpentine/dmso mixture to harden/toughen the soles up.  We are able to ride him a little now, but nothing overly stressful and only a walk.
    SolarisUser is Offline
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    05 Jul 2010 10:46 AM

     Sorry to hear that!  Painting on venice turpentine will help with stinging, but it doesn't last long.  I'd try to fit him with some boots and pads until he can get shoes on to see if that will help relieve some of the pressure.  Some feet do stay flat, even with a great trim.

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 08:30 AM

    We have one that gets these bruises occassionally, and he's shod all the way around.  Shoes won't stop them from getting bruises, but it might lessen the possibility of getting one on a horse that has pancake soles.  We used Shur-Hoof (and still do on him) and EZ Boots until he fully recovered.

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 09:42 AM

    [quote user="WillowLark"]We are painting his soles with a venice turpentine/dmso mixture to harden/toughen the soles up. [/quote]

    You might want to try Keratex Hoof Hardener on his soles. While I have never used it myself (although I have used their Hoof Gel, which is a great product), I have heard that it works wonders at toughening up the soles and wall. Another product for sore hooves that people rave about is Magic Cushion.

    Sorry I don't have any further advice for you, as I have never dealt with this issue myself. Good luck!

     

    SolarisUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 10:01 AM

    Just a note on Magic Cushion -- I've heard the raves too, so I checked it out last time I was at the store.  It's primarily just venice turpentine with some stuff added to make it gloopy so you can pack it, then marked up 500% so folks think it's special.  You can save a lot of money by just packing in some venice turpentine mixed with an agent to thicken it, perhaps sugar to make a paste.

    BuckskinPaintUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 03:46 PM
      Thank you all.  I was thinking of trying the keratex. Do you think Easy Boots would fit him? He has an odd shaped foot with flares. We tried a Boa boot with some roll cotton instead of bandaging him at first. It didn't fit right over the flared part. I was researching boots the other night and noticed a-lot of different brands. How do I go about measuring his feet for boots while keeping the flares in mind. I don't want them to be too big or too small. I would like to have boots for him though, especially for trail rides.
    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 04:48 PM

    If he has flares, they need to be addressed before you buy boots. Otherwise, the boots probably will not fit him once the flares are addressed (although, if this is *hopefully* just a temporary fix until his soles heal, then you might want to just buy the boots). How is your farrier/trimmer trimming Jet? If it's a standard pasture trim, your horse's hooves will keep flaring, splitting, and chipping unless he gets shoes.

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 04:52 PM

    [quote user="Solaris"]Just a note on Magic Cushion -- I've heard the raves too, so I checked it out last time I was at the store.  It's primarily just venice turpentine with some stuff added to make it gloopy so you can pack it, then marked up 500% so folks think it's special.[/quote]

    Interesting! I've never used it, but I've kind of kept it in my mental files as a "just in case." The way people go on about it, you would think it was magical hoof armor! I guess I'll just stick with Keratex. :-)

     

    SolarisUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 05:34 PM

     Agreed, if there are flares, they need to be taken care of immediately.  This could be contributing greatly to his flat footedness.  Do you have pics of his feet?

    BuckskinPaintUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 06:26 PM
    1) I don't have pics of his feet, but I can get some.
    2) I guess it's just a pasture trim. I don't know much about trimming except that I can't find a barefoot trimmer in my area.
    3) I'm looking for a new farrier! The other day when I took his feet out of the soaks and toweled them off I noticed he had trimmed out part of the sole near the toe. He knew he was off at the trot for a week at that time too. Am I crazy or are farriers not supposed to do that to flat-footed horses?  (please correct me where I am wrong...I'm a relatively new horse ''mommy'') 
    The other farrier I like is really hard to get and is not dependable unfortunately.  Any Ideas as to finding a new farrier? The one that did Jet last is in high demand and came highly recommended. Goes to show you huh? (what he did/ didn't do for Jet's feet is a longer story...if you want more details I can share) 

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    06 Jul 2010 08:34 PM

    Good farriers/trimmers are indeed hard to find! I would ask around, especially at feed stores. Around here, we get a lot of info from our feed stores! There are always bulletin boards there, as well (although some of the farriers & trimmers take the other farriers'/ trimmers' fliers down all the time -- so childish!). If you want to stick with barefoot, I can recommend looking into someone from the Oregon School of Natural Hoofcare. My trimmer graduated from there and she had a very sensible approach and did an excellent trim. I would stay away from the Strasser camp, as they are far too aggressive, in my opinion (I do not believe in carving concavity into the horse's hoof!!).

    As far as trimming the sole out, that can depend. There is sole and then there is "false sole," so it depends on which one of those was trimmed. Pics of his feet would certainly be helpful (although I am no professional, I am starting to develop a good eye for a properly-balanced hoof).

    BuckskinPaintUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2010 03:34 PM
        I was going to take pictures today of Jet's feet, But the GOOD farrier came out. YAY!!!! He couldn't believe what the other farrier had done to the horses. To one owner, he kept repeating that her horse would have been better off if the the other farrier had never touched him :(  Jet got shoes put on and he kept saying how the things the other guy had done wrong were basic knowledge...stuff you learn in farrier school. Basically Jet was done just plain wrong! His frogs are still off center even after this first corrective trim.  The other guy said that some horses feet are just shaped weird, and that they'll just never look balanced....HUH??? ( I asked, He answered, I trusted, Jet got sore...bad all 'round)  Basically the other guy is NEVER touching Jet again!!! When the good farrier was here earlier, I asked him for a reference for a trustworthy farrier in case of emergency. This person is so unlike many in the industry! He actually was happy to give a name and number...AND he plans to contact the other farrier to let him know he passed on his information so he will be prepared should we need to call! Wow am I happy He's back!!! It was so sad seeing Jet rear up from pain when he had his first front foot picked up. I was soooo happy I almost cried when the farrier got to the second front foot and he stood there because he now had somewhere to stand. The farrier then proceeded to apologize to Jet for not being there for him. I know that farriers not being able to be reached is a very bad thing. I also know a modest, talented farrier is a very valuable thing. Now that we have a backup that is recommended by the talented farrier I think life is good. 
    Sorry about the length...I'm just really REALLY happy Jet's on the road to recovery!!! 

    SolarisUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2010 06:05 PM

     Oh yay, what a happy story!  Don't kick yourself too much -- the same thing happened to me.  I trusted a lazy farrier for too long and at this point I don't think Solo's feet will ever fully recover.  The only good thing I can say is that we've been working with someone wonderful for about a year and it's so great seeing my horse comfortable all the time.  Learning is part of the process and the key is that you asked questions and stuck with it for your horse's well-being, so be proud of that because there are many who don't!!

    FrizzleUser is Offline
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    08 Jul 2010 08:34 PM

    Sounds like you've found a real gem there, BP! Good farriers are, indeed, hard to find. When I got Mac, his feet were being done by a very well-respected, very expensive farrier. However, he apparently would do a great job on certain horses and a not-so great job on others; unfortunately, Mac was in the second category. His front feet were so uneven that his knees were completely unlevel -- they were about an inch off! Thankfully, I found a farrier who was reasonably priced and got Mac's feet back in shape. I think the whole "farrier nightmare" scenario is something that most horse owner go through -- you are definitely not alone! I'm just glad to hear that you've found someone who is both competent and kind; that is a truly priceless combination!

    txspotsUser is Offline
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    09 Jul 2010 05:51 AM

    [quote user="Solaris"]

     Oh yay, what a happy story!  Don't kick yourself too much -- the same thing happened to me.  I trusted a lazy farrier for too long and at this point I don't think Solo's feet will ever fully recover.  The only good thing I can say is that we've been working with someone wonderful for about a year and it's so great seeing my horse comfortable all the time.  Learning is part of the process and the key is that you asked questions and stuck with it for your horse's well-being, so be proud of that because there are many who don't!!

    [/quote]Yep -what Solo said exactly - Yay!

    Only thing I would add is be a little wary of any farrier who will criticize too much another farrier's work, not real professional if you know what I mean, and sometimes makes you wonder if they're doing that to build up their own work. . .

    So happy for you!  Party!!!Yes

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