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Cough/Runny nose
Last Post 15 Jun 2011 11:16 AM by FocusCalmPatience. 37 Replies.
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SZabinskiUser is Offline
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23 May 2011 05:35 PM
    At the barn where my horse is stabled there seems to be 'something' going around amoung the horses. Several of them have runny noses, thick greenish/yellowish mucus and they are coughing. Barn manager is very unconcerned and very blase about it. Me, on the other hand, I am very concerned. What ever it is, it is contagious. My horse is not showing any symptoms as of yet.
     
    A couple of new horses came in a few weeks ago - 3/4 weeks, but since then no new horses and none of the horses have been off the farm at all.   
     
     Any suggestions? Any ideas? Thanks!
     
    Sherrie
    Equi SearchUser is Offline
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    23 May 2011 07:00 PM
    Get a vet involved. He/she will be able to wake up the BO, and order quarantine, if necessary. In the meantime, you might want to move your horse away from any of the horses that are showing signs of the sickness, and that might be tough, given the BO blasé attitude about a contagious sickness. By now the whole barn probably has gotten the sickness, and although some will get it I'm sure some will be able to fight it off with better immune system. The newcomers are likely the disease carriers, though nobody ever quarantines a new horse at a boarding stable. You may luck out, with a good immune system on your horse, but get a vet to determine what you are dealing with.

    I don't know what symptoms are shown by the respiratory form of Equine Herpes Virus, but in the West the neurological form of EHV has just surfaced. Many horses have died, and many more are infected. Since EHV-1 is on the West coast, I'd be worried that another strain of EHV has hit the East coast. That calls for a vet, just to be sure.
    SZabinskiUser is Offline
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    23 May 2011 09:45 PM

    Hi Megan,

    One of the boarders has 2 horses sick with it.  She has called her vet and he said it sounded viral.  I think he is due out tomorrow.  I am going to call mine in the morning just as a precaution.  I am just shocked by the attitude of the BO.  She has 18 horses at the barn and at least 6 have come down with it in the last 2 days.  It is just so irresponsible and crazy not to call a vet to at least find out what it is and what dangers in could pose.  If it is something serious and she doesn't do anything and it could have been arrested, she could really be in deep trouble.  There is also nothing I can do right now with my horse without a vet saying so.  She will not allow me to move him away from the infected horses, in fact he is in the paddock right by one that has a really bad cough. 

    I have been at this barn just a few months.  It is the worst managed place I have been, there is horse crap everywhere.  She has a couple of paddocks that the horse crap is so bad the horses have little area to walk without stepping in it, much less any clean grass to eat.  It would not surprise me if this sickness started with all the unsanitary conditions that are everywhere.  I clean my own paddock weekly because she will not do it.  I had to ask to have my paddock's weeds cut when they were 2 ft. tall!   Then she made me sign a paper that if my horse got sick because she cut the grass that it was my responsiblity not her's!  The smaller paddocks are now all over stocked and over grazed. 

    I have found a new barn Sunday and I am moving next month to a barn that in appearance alone is a well cared for barn, not to mention the 2 hour interview/walk through that I was given.  I was totally mislead by this woman and her friends.  I went here because the price was so much cheaper.  You really do get what you paid for, and I have learned my lesson with this! 

    Thank you for your advise,

    Sherrie  

     

     

     

     

    GailforceUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 01:40 AM

    sounds awful.  glad you're moving.  what's the deal with moving your horse (sick or not) from the sick barn to a new barn?

    i looked at your pics.  your horse is awfully cute and your dog, too.Big Smile

    SZabinskiUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 02:57 AM

    New barn can't accept me until middle of June.  Has to wait till the 3 horses that are leaving go to their new homes in their new state.  Also BO at this barn won't give me back my board and I can't waste several hundred dollars. 

    Thank you on my horse picture.  He is a mess and my therapy, the best therapy a woman can have.  My dog, Cooper.  I lost Cooper last September from an undiagnoised illness.  He was just 4 years old.  He was my joy, my heart, and he loved me obsessively.  He was loyal, brave, kind, protective, smart, fun, and my horse loved him.  In 3 weeks he went from a 90 lb. healthy male lab to 74 lbs. and in complete kidney failure.  It has been the hardest death that I have gone through yet.  I miss him terribly still. 

    Interesting thing about Cooper and my horse Lil' C.  I was diagnoised with stage 2 anal cancer last March.  Have been cancer free for about 10 months now.  I started with the symptoms and going to the doctors in November of 2009 and it took them till March of 2010 to find it.  But Coop and Lil' C knew it long before.  They constantly smelled my lower back region to the point that I shooing them away and wondering out loud why they kept smelling me there.  It got to the point it was almost annoying.  Should have listened to them, huh?  They knew long before the doc's did.  Cooper never left me when I was going through my cancer treatments.  Whenever I went from room to room he was my constant shadow.  He slept beside me in the bed every or layed beside me on the floor when I wasn't laying down.  His love for me was so pure and giving.  Two months after I was told I was in remission he died. 

    I was given a crematorium cross necklace for Christmas last year with Cooper's name engraved on it.  I have some of his ashes in the cross and he still rides with Lil' C and me everywhere. 

    Sherrie  

     

     

     

     

    FocusCalmPatienceUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 04:27 AM
    Just as a precaution, you might want to give your horse some vitamin C to help boost his immune system.  Good luck!  I hope he stays healthy until you move! 
    Equi SearchUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 09:17 AM
    [quote user="SZabinski"]

    New barn can't accept me until middle of June.[/quote]

    I hope Lil' C is over the sickness, if he does get it, before you move. Please make sure the new BO is aware of it if he does come down with it: you don't want to spread it around the new barn. I hope the vet visit goes as well as expected, considering the problems.

    [quote user="SZabinski"]

    But Coop and Lil' C knew it long before.

    [/quote]

    Yes, animals are amazing. Your story is wonderful, but not surprising given the nature of dogs and horses. Coop probably smelled something odd--dogs have a sense of smell thousands of times better than ours--and although horses can detect scent more easily than us, they're not as good as dogs. Lil' C must have smelled something, too. I'm sorry you lost Coop, but Lil' C is still with you and will be going to new, better quarters soon. Good job. 

    poco buenoUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 02:16 PM

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    24 May 2011 03:36 PM
    I believe that having penicillin and STMZ on hand--and administering them without a vet's directions--is extremely foolish. If you are injecting penicillin into a horse that does not show signs of actually having a disease is not to your horse's benefit, and more important, not to ANYBODY'S benefit. Throwing antibiotics at sickness "just in case" promotes the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, and that is borderline criminal. The drug-resistant bacteria cost everyone eventually: I had to spend nearly $500 for a one-week-long dose of a medication that could kill the drug-resistant bacteria found in my mare after she had surgery. It really angers me to see people like you, Poco Bueno, playing vet and giving medicines with no vet's approval. 
    GailforceUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 03:43 PM

    your story about your illness and the animals' discovery of it and then the loss of your beautiful dog is both touching and sad.

    what a story!  glad you are in remission.

    have fun with your horse.

    SZabinskiUser is Offline
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    24 May 2011 07:10 PM

    And the saga continues!  This is crazy.  Really crazy.  I talked to my vet today @ length about this.  It is without a doubt bacterial.  Bacterial is yellow/green snotty runny noses.  Viral snotty nose is clear or white.  He is quick sure by all that I told him it is a bacterial respiratory infection.  He said to quarantine my horse and all horse that are not showing signs of being sick.  Wash your hands if you tough anything that belongs to another horse or a horse itself.  Keep everything separate and as clean as possible.  A secondary sickness from this could be sinus infections and pneumonia.  He was quite shocked and concerned that the barn manager had not even bothered to call the office to even asked. 

    And as of 5 o'clock today she had not.  I know this has been going on for at least 5 days.  I know where it started and I understand how it has spread.  There is this beautiful QH mare that is made to stand in an enclosed stall 24/7.  Her owner shows up ever 3/4 days to clean her stall and let her out into the paddock for about 30 minutes then she is put right back into the barn.  The stall is nasty most of the time.  She is very sick with it.  Her nose is crusty with it and her cough is the worse of all the horses.  She has been patted by the other horse owners and they have transmitted the infection to the other horses.  

    When I got to the barn today, I was shocked.  Two of the sick horses had been moved.  One onto a clean pasture that no horses have been on in 2 weeks.  The other sick horse in the pasture with a horse that is not sick.  Three other horse where in the pasture where 2 of the sick horses had just came out of.  I went to the manager today to let her know that I was moving my horse away from the sick horses and told her what the vet said. She was furious.  First she told me just to put my horse in the barn!  I told her no, there is a sick horse in there and she just went ballistic.  It is quite apparent to me that this is all about her ego, not the horses care and she really does not have any idea of what she is doing.  At one point she actually accused me of starting the virus!  Her words.. "I think maybe you had something to do with starting this just so you could cause me trouble!"  I could not believe what I was hearing.  I am just totally shocked. This is about her ego, not about the horses care.  That is all that this whole thing is about her ego and she is caught not knowing what to do and instead of being an adult and trying to figure things out for what is best for the horses, it is about her ego.  I was told it is her barn, she will do with it like she wants to keep my nose out of it. 

    Why is it that people who think they know about horses are usually the ones that really don't and they refuse to listen to even a vets advise.  I feel I am fairly knowledgeable about horses, have been around them my whole life, but there is ALWAYS something to learn.  No one knows it all and there is so many people that know so much more than me.  I would be doing myself such an injustice by being close minded and not learning more. 

    22 more days and I am gone from this living nightmare!.. lol.  

     

     

    FocusCalmPatienceUser is Offline
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    25 May 2011 04:22 AM
    I would def get some vitamin C for your horse, and check around and see if maybe you can stash Lil C at a friend's or something until the new barn opens up.  I would be terrified to keep my horse at such a place for a further 22 days, especially with the BO acting like a maniac. Pneumonia is NO JOKE, horses die from it all the time.  Your boy is lovely, I hope he survives this ordeal unscathed. 
    boysgirl_horseUser is Offline
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    25 May 2011 08:33 AM

    I hope your vet goes out there and quarantines the whole place!  Your BO is an idiot!  This could be a possible outbreak of strangles...

    Get your boy out of there!!! 

     

    SpottedPony_horseUser is Offline
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    25 May 2011 08:36 AM

    I agree, if you can get your horse out of there into a temperary place until the new place has a stall free, go for it.  Even better if the temperary place doesn't have any horses on the property or near by.  That way if your horse does get this bug, you won't be exposing the horses at the new barn to it and it will serve as a quarnteen and reasure the new barn owner that your horse won't be bringing anything into the barn and making the other horses sick. 

    Good luck.

    Spotted Pony

    Equi SearchUser is Offline
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    25 May 2011 08:45 AM
    I agree with FCP, get Lil' C out of there, any way you can. It may cost you some money, but you have to get him away from the sick horses ASAP before he gets it. Is there a horse hotel somewhere near you could use until the new barn has room? Would the new barn allow you to put Lil' C in just a pasture until a stall opens up? Ask your vet: maybe he, or another vet, has a clinic with stalls and you could use one of them. That's expensive, but we're talking about your boy here.

    Not only do you want Lil' C somewhere else, YOU need to get away from the BO. She sounds like a maniac, likely to do anything b/c she thinks you are "hurting" her and her barn. A loose cannon like that is just too scary to deal with. You do NOT want her to do something to Lil' C in revenge for you calling her on the carpet.
    poco buenoUser is Offline
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    26 May 2011 10:02 AM

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    SZabinskiUser is Offline
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    26 May 2011 10:55 AM
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    26 May 2011 03:57 PM
    [quote user="poco bueno"]

    I don't just rush in and start playing vet without consulting a vet ahead of time.

    [/quote]
    I can guarantee you that no vet told you to inject a horse with penicillin if it showed NO signs of an illness. Since you did--your own words--that means you either lied to the vet about the symptoms or did the injection without a vet's approval. Neither of those actions impress me much. Sherrie noticed--and I did, too, on your very first post of this forum--that you seem to have a pretty good opinion of yourself. We don't need that here: this forum is about horse people helping each other, not about calling each other "amateurs" who need to be talked down to at a "ninth grade level".

    I, myself, have two college degrees: a BS in Journalism and Public Communication, and a BS in Aeronautical Science. I know that others here are as well educated, in general and in horse topics, too. I don't need to be condescended to by someone with an elevated image of himself or herself.

    Sherrie and I are going to return to the actual topic of this thread, and discuss how she can help her horse. After all, that's what the forum is about. I think you need to find another forum where your self-image can be massaged, but I'm sorry, you won't get that here.
    GailforceUser is Offline
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    26 May 2011 06:09 PM

    Alright, back to the horses, you guys Wink

    If I was in this situation, I would have trouble leaving my horse there unattended.  I would be very concerned about this woman doing something vengeful.  That said, I can go over the top worrying about people doing strange things, and they rarely do Embarrassed

    Still, at the very least, I would want to move out of there, because of risk of unknown disease. 

    If the sick horses belong to other boarders, aren't any of them worried enough to get the vet out?  Maybe a few of you, whether your horse is sick or not, could get get a vet call out there and split the expense.  You would probably only need to test one horse to find out what it is.

    FocusCalmPatienceUser is Offline
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    27 May 2011 04:38 AM
    I really hope this discussion doesn't alienate anyone from the forum, because participation is rather low these days, and I always think the more opinions you get, the better off you are!  
    ANYWAY, I just posted about the equine Herpes outbreak, and one of the signs IS nasal discharge. So take your horses temperature, because in addition, one of the initial signs is a temp spike to 102 degrees.  What state are you in?  At any rate, read up on the info I posted and anything else you find to make sure that is not what is going around your barn before moving anywhere, we don't want to be spreading this around.
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