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What do you feed your yearlings?
Last Post 10 Jul 2006 03:47 PM by Wolfy&Victor. 18 Replies.
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AnonymousUser is Offline
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10 Jul 2006 01:15 AM
    Stitch was a year old on May 1st. I was boarding & brought them home about a month ago, so I've been continuing what he was used to ~ Omolene 300.

    I put Magic, my 15 yo Arab on Omolene 100, but this weekend I picked up a bag of 10% pelleted feed at Tractor Supply. (Had stopped at a new feed store to check it out & they were out of the 100)

    The Omolene is full of molasses compared to this one & honestly, it seems like the oats in the Omolene just goes straight through them. Smile

    I'd consider switching Stitch to a "generic" brand as well... cost isn't a big factor to me (but I'm always out to save a few bucks of course!), but I just want to make sure he's getting everything he needs!
    Jumper22User is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 04:39 AM
    I have a yearling now and I don't feed her sweetfeed of any kind. She is also a warmblood which makes a bit of difference. She is fed Masterfeed Equine Developer Pellet 12%. 1-1.5kg per 100kg of body weight. I chose a feed that was a complete feed, where all the necessary vitamins, minerals and nutrients were already in the feed. I like to keep it as simple as possible. This is a feed that is designed for the growing horse up until their second year. She is also on free choice hay and grass in the summer.
    654494User is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 07:09 AM
    All my yearlings get good quality hay or grass 24/7 and whole oats with access to both salt and min/via blocks. Fed that all my life its a good balanced ration and its very cost effective here.
    JanJhorsesUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 09:20 AM
    You do not say where you are from so I am not sure what deficiencies there are in the feed in your area. Feeding is always a balancing act. What you feed for grain or concentrates should balance out your hay or roughage. That is why a book about feeding is often inches thick.
    I read labels on all the feed I get. Both for overall percentages and for what is in it. I do not want a concentrate that is made up mostly of by products.
    AnonymousUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 11:30 AM
    I'm in Fort Worth, Texas. Looking at the Omolene tag shows "Grain products, plant protein products, processed grain by-products, calcium carbonate, molasses products, etc". The tractor supply brand shows "Wheat middlings, ground rice hulls, cracked corn, coarse barley, cane molasses, etc."

    I've been reading a good bit online but there is just SO much information, it's overwhelming. My horses get several flakes of good coastal 3 times a day.

    Even just the choices at Tractor Supply (nevermind the feed store I go to ~ they have a chalk board FULL of types) lists several I would consider... how to decide?

    1) DuMor Pleasure Horse ~ fresh grains & fortified pellets, 3% fat, 12% protein, 10% fiber
    2) Senior Horse ~ 3% fat, 14% protein, 16% fiber, pellets
    3) Dumor Pleasure Plus ~ 6% fat, 14% protein, 10% fiber
    4) Producer's Pride Sweet Feed ~ 2.5% fat, 10% protein, 18.5% fiber
    5) PP Feed w/out Molasses ~ 3% fat, 10% protein, 12.5% fiber
    6) Oats ~ 4% fat, 9.5% protein, 12.5% fiber
    7) All grain feed ~ 2% fat, 10% protein, 8% fiber

    I was reading online that said higher fiber is better.... was surprised to see the Omolene only has 6-7%. One site said even 13-14% is better & helps prevent colic, founder, etc.

    Stitch currently gets 16% protein. I feel comfortable with Magic at 10%. What about fat? Is more or less better?

    Would love to hear anyone's opinions of sweet feed vs. pellets, name brand over store brands, oats, etc.

    THANK YOU!!!! :-)
    QrtrhorserUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 12:43 PM
    I have a yearling and I also DO NOT feed any grain or sweet feed! Not too good for them IMO, so my little guy gets Orchard Grass hay twice a day and Local Grass hay twice a day, and then for his late night feeding he also gets Rolled oats which are easy to digest and LMF Super Supliments which is vtms. He's doing great and when his new coat came in it was shinny and nice, and his feet have turned around 100% since I got him!
    AnonymousUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 01:18 PM
    Nutrena Develop is what I've used in the past until the horse was 2 y/o. All of my horses are on Nutrena XTN now. Definitely feed a grain that's formulated for growing horses. And feed it at the recommended amount. Protein deficiency will stunt their growth and that's why "youth" formulas are 14-16% protein.
    AngelDunItUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 02:13 PM
    Heck, I think Progressive has feeds that are in the 30% protein range, I think thats what their ProAdvantage is anyways.

    To the OP, I never, never feed sweet feed. Not to adult horses, not to babies. I personally would not feed a non-brand name feed, simply because I would not trust the mill it came from. Alot of feed mills process cow feed, goat feed, sheep, etc. so I wouldn't want to guess, or wonder whats in the feed. Plus, alot of the non-brand name feeds, are bagged in super cheap brown paper sack type bags, and I have NEVER had good experiences with those. I've found mice holes in them, mice feces, and mold. If you want more bang for your buck, get Nutrena or Progressive. Expensive, yes, but Progressive for example has more nutrients packed in just one pound, you'd have to feed multiple pounds of another feed to get the same benefits, so its a bit more efficient. If you truly can't spend a whole lot out right on a feed, try Safe & Sound by Acco. I feed that as a maintanance feed, and its been wonderful, and costs me I think $10 and is even good for low maintanance youngsters.
    Wolfy&VictorUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 02:19 PM
    Can I ask why you don't feed sweet feed? I have always fed sweet feed to any horse I have ever had, and have never had any problems. Just curious why you don't like it?
    AngelDunItUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 02:33 PM
    Because there are a lot of 'fillers' in it, and way too much sugar/molasses to be beneficial. With how varied/mixed a sweet feed can be, it cannot provide adequate protein, can cause bad habits because its so sweet, a horse will refuse non-sweet foods later in life. I want a feed that has a specific protein amount, fat... Since a horse naturally would not eat grains/pellets/feed, etc. whatever I do feed the horse in that aspect, I want it fed for specific health reasons like a certain needed % of protein for a growing horse, certain levels of phospherous, amino acids for strong topline and muscles, etc. etc. Things I don't feel sweet feed provides. I've known people who feed it in winter because it provides warmth they say, but really, it just burns like a carb, so you could feed straight oats and get the same thing, but would actually be better off feeding a feed with high protein since protein is what keeps a horse warmest.

    Clear as mud? Wink
    921048User is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 02:43 PM
    I know you directed that at Jess, but I'll give my opinion anyway! Grin I personally don't like sweet feeds because I don't need to add sugar to my horses' diets, they can turn rancid in warm weather, and they freeze in cold weather. Pellets and oats are easier to handle and store. I will use sweet feed occasionally to disguise meds, but not as a main diet.

    To the OP, there are many options for balancing a ration, Nutrena is my current brand of choice (no Progressive around here or I'd look into it), but I've also done well with youngsters on a 12% complete pellet with appropriately balanced supplements. At the time I was managing an 80-horse farm and it was simpler to do it that way, but I would think with just a few it would be simpler and more cost-effective to use a ration designed for growing horses. And when I used Nutrena's web site to ask for feed recommendations, I got a prompt response and the local Nutrena nutritionist has been very helpful.
    Wolfy&VictorUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 03:47 PM
    No I don't mind at all, thanks and thanks jess.
    I grew up in england, and we grew up feeding sweet feed, as we were always told oats will give the horse alot more energy,and more on their toes.
    Its interesting to hear all the different points of view.
    Can't say that I am going to change feeds as I have no problems with sweet feed and my horses are in great condition, but may look at other feeds.
    Sorry OP for hijacking!!
    AnonymousUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 06:05 PM
    yep their balancers are b/c they're so concentrated. My dream is to marry a guy who owns a feedstore that sells progressive, lol. Grin
    chandabUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 08:47 PM
    Quote:

    Heck, I think Progressive has feeds that are in the 30% protein range, I think thats what their ProAdvantage is anyways.





    I feed Progressive Nutrition ProAdvantage grass balancer to all my horses; yearlings to 23 years old; they all look great. The amount you feed is based on weight and activity (growth, maintenance, breeding, etc).
    The grass balancer has 30% protein; the alfalfa balancer has a lower protein level, as alfalfa is higher in protein than grass.
    I just love how my horses look on the Progressive and they get everything they need in just a small scoop of feed. If your horse needs more energy, then you can add plain oats to the mix.

    Edited to add: Purina makes a couple of ration balancers... Born to Win and Mare & Maintenance They are similar to the Progessive, but marketed by PUrina.
    AnonymousUser is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 09:11 PM
    Very interesting info! Thanks! Good point on the "no name" and yep.. it's in that brown paper bag.. LOL. I would have to wonder about some getting mixed up with the goat & cow feed.. and whatever else they make!

    That's why I felt comfortable with Purina... party due to their name. And I'm not quite as comfortable with the sweet feed... I think I'd like more of a pellet, or maybe mix 1/2 and 1/2 with some oats. I'll see what my local feed store has this weekend!

    More thoughts & opinions? Keep them coming :-)
    robison02User is Offline
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    10 Jul 2006 10:31 PM
    A yearling needs a lot of nutrition to develop strong bones, tendons, ligaments, and muscles. The nutrtion he gets as a young horse can have a big effect on how he physically matures.

    With all our horses, regardless of age, we build around our forage. So, they are all on pasture and/or grass hay. But, we have some mineral deficiencies around here so I put my young horses and broodmares on a feed designed to support their specific nutritional needs. I use Buckeye Gro 'n Win topdressed on oats and give all the horses free choice loose mineral, also from Buckeye.

    You may want to do some reading on the websites of some of the major horse feed companies (Nutrena, Purina, TDI, Buckeye, Kent, etc.) and also on Equisearch.
    702147User is Offline
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    11 Jul 2006 01:42 AM
    I feed hay and equine jr to my young uns Smile

    Jessi
    654494User is Offline
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    11 Jul 2006 06:25 AM
    Actually rolled oats is a grain just as any type oats, corn , barley, wheat, etc. is.
    JanJhorsesUser is Offline
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    11 Jul 2006 12:03 PM
    Often a local feed balanced for the local area will be lots better then the name brands. I am not sure what is lacking in the soil in your area, you are a bit far from me.... Smile

    More fiber is better for horses then less. All they can eat hay or grass is how they live best but is not always the way we can afford to feed them. Concentrates or grains are how we get enough calories into them for a cheaper amount of money. So if they are getting plenty of hay to keep from getting bored then I would not go with the high fiber grain. The higher the fiber is the more you need to feed to get the calories out of it. So one up to the 16% is 16% nonusable bulk that will come out the other end....really good fo a horse that is not gettign hay but not so good on a horse you want to put weight on or are feeding hay/grass.

    My choice would be 3) Dumor Pleasure Plus ~ 6% fat, 14% protein, 10% fiber if you need to put extra weight on
    or
    3) Dumor Pleasure Plus ~ 6% fat, 14% protein, 10% fiber if added wieght is not needed.
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