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It’s Gold Again for the Home Team

The Brits win their country's first-ever Olympic dressage medal as the American team ends up sixth in London with another major disappointment for U.S. fans

Charlotte Dujardin and her mentor, Carl Hester, enjoy a victory lap after taking team gold for Great Britain in dressage (photo copyright 2012 by Nancy Jaffer)
Charlotte Dujardin and her mentor, Carl Hester, enjoy a victory lap after taking team gold for Great Britain in dressage (© 2012 by Nancy Jaffer)

August 7, 2012 -- A BBC announcer waxing eloquent this morning on the TV before I left for Greenwich Park, contended that "the streets of London are paved with gold" because of the country's medal success here.

Now they can add another brick. Britain's dressage team earned its country's 20th gold medal (the largest number since the 1908 London Games) by a narrow margin this afternoon over Germany, which ended the winning streak that nation had enjoyed for the last seven Olympics.

"To have come here and won any medal would have been amazing but to come here and win gold; I don't think it has sunk in completely yet. It's an incredible feeling for the three of us, and I think we're all really proud of each other," said Laura Bechtolsheimer, who partnered with Carl Hester and Charlotte Dujardin to make the dream of winning Britain's first dressage medal come true.

Britain wound up with a total of 79.979 percent, to Germany's 78.216 and the Netherlands' 77.124. The U.S. was far out of the medals in sixth place with 72.435 percent, behind Denmark (73.846) and Sweden (72.706).

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The stadium once again was packed to its capacity of 23,000, and following the British victory, fans did their version of the wave, utilizing the Union Jack, flapping it in a variety of sizes as the arena came alive. Throughout the tests, it was obvious that the spectators were educated in dressage, as they "oohed" in sympathy over spooks and mistakes.

Charlotte Dujardin and Valegro scored 83.286 for Great Britain to head the results column in the Grand Prix Special (photo copyright 2012 by Nancy Jaffer)
Charlotte Dujardin and Valegro scored 83.286 for Great Britain to head the results column in the Grand Prix Special (© 2012 by Nancy Jaffer)

The whole competition had sparkle. It's a refreshing era of new faces on the podium. Charlotte, whose score of 83.286 on Valegro became the highest in the class, was making her Games debut, as was the entire German team of Dorothee Schneider, Helen Langehanenberg and Kristina Sprehe.

When I wondered how the Germans felt about the end of their streak, Helen promptly replied, "Everybody asks us if we have lost the gold medal. No, we have won the silver medal. We are really happy."

Helen, fourth on Damon Hill (78.937) was thrilled after her ride. She acknowledged the crowd not only by waving, but also by giving cute little nods with her head.

Charlotte joined her mentor, Carl, third overall on Uthopia (80.571) and Laura (for whose father Carl once worked) in boosting the cause of British dressage. Both Carl and Charlotte started as grooms, which they believe is proof that hard work offers a foothold from which the aspiring can rise in the world of dressage.

That's a nice contrast to the continuing "elitist" chant about the sport that got amplified because Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, is one of the owners of Rafalca, Jan Ebeling's ride on the U.S. team.

This is the first Olympics where the team medals are based on the Grand Prix and the Grand Prix Special, not just the Grand Prix. After the Grand Prix, Britain was leading Germany by 0.562 percent, and the two remained neck and neck in the Special.

It was Valegro's spectacular test that won it for the British. He got eight 10's, perfect marks, for a range of movements including the extended trot and the two-tempis, but was penalized for anticipating in the extended walk and got scores of 5 to 6 for a fumble in the one-tempis. But those minor transgressions hardly mattered, such is his quality and his rapport with his rider. It is beautiful to see a partnership like this, built on years of training and trust. Sadly, though, Valegro, like Uthopia, will be for sale following a little vacation after the Games.

Posted in Nancy Jaffer, Olympics 2012: Dressage | Leave a comment

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